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Filling the Gap 115 Years after Ronald Ross: The Distribution of the Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae s.s from Freetown and Monrovia, West Africa

Authors
Journal
PLoS ONE
1932-6203
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Volume
8
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064939
Keywords
  • Research Article
  • Biology
  • Ecology
  • Ecological Metrics
  • Relative Abundance Distribution
  • Biogeography
  • Microbiology
  • Vector Biology
  • Anopheles
  • Zoology
  • Entomology
  • Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Tropical Diseases (Non-Neglected)
  • Malaria
  • Vectors And Hosts
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

It was in Freetown, Sierra Leone, that the malaria mosquito Anopheles coastalis, now known as Anopheles gambiae, was first discovered as the vector of malaria, in 1899. That discovery led to a pioneering vector research in Sierra Leone and neighbouring Liberia, where mosquito species were extensively characterized. Unfortunately, the decade long civil conflicts of the 1990s, in both countries, resulted in a stagnation of the once vibrant research on disease vectors. This paper attempts to fill in some of the gaps on what is now known of the distribution of the sibling species of the An. gambiae complex, and especially the An. coluzzii and An. gambiae s.s, formerly known as the An. gambiae molecular M and S forms respectively, in the cities of Freetown and Monrovia.

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