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Short-term and one-year outcome of infective endocarditis in adult patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital during 1980–2004

Authors
Journal
BMC Infectious Diseases
1471-2334
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
7
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-7-78
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Education
  • Medicine

Abstract

1471-2334-7-78.fm BioMed CentralBMC Infectious Diseases ss Open AcceResearch article Short-term and one-year outcome of infective endocarditis in adult patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital during 1980–2004 Maija Heiro1, Hans Helenius2, Saija Hurme2, Timo Savunen3, Erik Engblom1, Jukka Nikoskelainen1 and Pirkko Kotilainen*1 Address: 1Department of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland, 2Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland and 3Department of Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland Email: Maija Heiro - [email protected]; Hans Helenius - [email protected]; Saija Hurme - [email protected]; Timo Savunen - [email protected]; Erik Engblom - [email protected]; Jukka Nikoskelainen - [email protected]; Pirkko Kotilainen* - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Previous studies on factors predicting the prognosis of infective endocarditis have given somewhat conflicting results. Our aim was to define the factors predicting the outcome of patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital. Methods: A total of 326 episodes of infective endocarditis in 303 patients treated during 1980– 2004 were evaluated for short-term and 1-year outcome and complications. Results: Infection of 2 native valves and the occurrence of neurological complications, peripheral emboli, or heart failure significantly predicted both in-hospital and 1-year mortality, while age ≥65 years or the presence of a major criterion or vegetation on echocardiography predicted death within 1 year. A significant trend was observed between the level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) on admission and both the short-term and 1-year outcome. In the patients who had CRP values ≥100 mg/l on admission, the hazard ratio for in-hospital death was 2.9-fold and the hazard ratio for 1-year death was 3.9-fold as compared to those with lower CRP values. Male sex and age < 64 years significantly predicted a need for both in

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