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Basal low antioxidant capacity correlates with cognitive deficits in early onset psychosis. A 2-year follow-up study

Authors
Journal
Schizophrenia Research
0920-9964
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
156
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.03.025
Keywords
  • First Episode
  • Psychosis
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Cognition
  • Non-Affective Psychosis

Abstract

Abstract The objective of the study is to examine the association of baseline total antioxidant status (TAS) and glutathione (GSH) levels with short- and long-term cognitive functioning in patients with early onset first-episode psychosis, comparing affective and non-affective psychoses. We analysed 105 patients with an early onset-first episode psychosis (age 9–17 years) and 97 healthy controls. Blood samples were taken at admission for measurement of TAS and GSH, and cognitive performance was assessed at baseline and at 2years of follow-up. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between TAS/GSH levels at baseline and cognitive performance at both time points, controlling for confounders. Baseline TAS and GSH levels were significantly lower in patients than healthy controls. In patients, baseline TAS was positively associated with the global cognition score at baseline (p=0.048) and two years later (p=0.005), while TAS was not associated with cognitive functioning in healthy controls. Further, baseline TAS in patients was specifically associated with the memory domain at baseline and with the memory and attention domains two years later. Stratifying by affective and non-affective psychoses, significant associations were only found between TAS and cognition in the non-affective psychosis group. Baseline GSH levels were not associated with cognitive functioning at either time point in either group. The antioxidant defence capacity in early onset first-episode psychotic patients is directly correlated with global cognition at baseline and at 2years of follow-up, especially in non-affective psychosis.

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