Affordable Access

Phospholiphase C is required for the control of stomatal aperture by ABA.

Publication Date
  • Qh301 Biology


The calcium-releasing second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture by ABA. In other signalling pathways, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the action of phospholipase C. We have studied the importance of phospholipase C in guard cell ABA-signalling pathways. Immunolocalisation of a calcium-activated phospholipase C confirmed the presence of phospholipase C in tobacco guard cells. Transgenic tobacco plants with considerably reduced levels of phospholipase C in their guard cells were only partially able to regulate their stomatal apertures in response to ABA. These results suggest that phospholipase C is involved in the amplification of the calcium signal responsible for reductions in stomatal aperture in response to ABA. As full ABA-induced inhibition of stomatal opening was not observed, our results support a role for the action of other calcium-releasing second messengers in the guard cell ABA-signalling pathway. It is not known whether these different calcium-releasing second messengers act in the same or parallel ABA-signalling pathways.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.