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Micro and Macro Data Integration: The Case of Capital

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  • Economics

Abstract

Micro and Macro Data Integration: The Case of Capital This PDF is a selection from a published volume from the National Bureau of Economic Research Volume Title: A New Architecture for the U.S. National Accounts Volume Author/Editor: Dale W. Jorgenson, J. Steven Landefeld, and William D. Nordhaus, editors Volume Publisher: University of Chicago Press Volume ISBN: 0-226-41084-6 Volume URL: http://www.nber.org/books/jorg06-1 Conference Date: April 16-17, 2004 Publication Date: May 2006 Title: Micro and Macro Data Integration: The Case of Capital Author: Randy A. Becker, John Haltiwanger URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c0146 12.1 Introduction It seems natural that statistical agencies would strive for internal consis- tency between macro- and microeconomic measures of key economic vari- ables quantifying the activities of businesses. That is, ideally a given mea- sure should be collected at the micro level (i.e., the firm or, even better, the establishment level) either from the universe of firms or from representa- tive surveys, and macro aggregates of the measure should reflect appropri- ately weighted aggregation (e.g., sums or means) of the underlying micro- data. Unfortunately, this ideal is achieved for very few of the key economic variables; the measures that come closest to this ideal are employment and 541 12 Micro and Macro Data Integration The Case of Capital Randy A. Becker, John Haltiwanger, Ron S. Jarmin, Shawn D. Klimek, and Daniel J. Wilson Randy Becker is a senior economist at the Center for Economic Studies of the U.S. Census Bureau. John Haltiwanger is a professor of economics at the University of Maryland, and a research associate of the Center for Economic Studies of the U.S. Census Bureau and of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Ron Jarmin is assistant division chief for research at the Center for Economic Studies of the U.S. Census Bureau. Shawn Klimek is an economist at the Center for Economic Studies (CES) of the U.S

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