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Results of the Damus-Stansel-Kaye Procedure for Transposition of the Great Arteries and for Double-Outlet Right Ventricle with Subpulmonary Ventricular Septal Defect

Authors
Journal
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
0003-4975
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
38
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0003-4975(10)64180-x
Keywords
  • Original Articles
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract From 1975 through 1982, the Damus-Stansel-Kaye procedure was performed on 20 patients with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA) and on 4 with double-outlet right ventricle (DORV) and subpulmonary ventricular septal defect (VSD). The patients ranged from 6 days to 20 years old (median age, 13 months). Associated anomalies included atrial septal defect (24 patients), VSD (14), and others (25). Thirteen patients had had palliative operations previously. Of the 14 hospital deaths (58%), 13 occurred among the 17 patients with one or more risk factors: age less than 18 months, weight less than 10 kg, and left ventricular peak systolic pressure less than 75% of systemic pressure. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 87 months (mean, 51 months). One patient died of cardiac failure two years postoperatively, and 2 required conduit replacement at 40 and 50 months because of stenosis. All 9 survivors are free from major symptoms. The Damus-Stansel-Kaye repair is most suitable for patients with TGA or DORV with subpulmonary VSD who are older than 18 months, weigh more than 10 kg, and have a “prepared left ventricle,” and whose coronary artery anatomy precludes transplantation.

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