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A Cross-cohort Description of Young People’s Housing Experience in Britain over 30 Years: An Application of Sequence Analysis

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Department of Qualitative Social Science, Institute of Education, London
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Department of Quantitative Social Science A cross-cohort description of young people’s housing experience in Britain over 30 years: An application of Sequence Analysis Dylan Kneale Ruth Lupton Polina Obolenskaya Richard D Wiggins DoQSS Working Paper No. 10-17 October 2010 DISCLAIMER Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and not those of the Institute of Education. Research published in this series may include views on policy, but the institute itself takes no institutional policy positions. DoQSS Workings Papers often represent preliminary work and are circulated to encourage discussion. Citation of such a paper should account for its provisional character. A revised version may be available directly from the author. Department of Quantitative Social Science. Institute of Education, University of London. 20 Bedford way, London WC1H 0AL, UK. A cross-cohort description of young people’s housing experience in Britain over 30 years: An application of Sequence Analysis Dylan Kneale∗, Ruth Lupton†, Polina Obolenskaya‡, Richard D Wig- gins§¶ Abstract. Objective: To compare patterns of leaving the parental home and early adult housing experiences of two British cohorts. Data: Two birth cohorts: the 1958 National Child Development Study (NCDS) and the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). Methods: Sequence Analysis supported by Event History Analysis. Key Findings: Despite only 12 years separating both cohorts, the younger 1970 cohort exhibited very different patterns of hous- ing including a slower progression out of the parental home and into stable tenure, and an increased reliance on privately rented housing. Returns to the parental home occurred across the twenties and into the thirties in both co- horts, although occurred more frequently and were more concentrated among certain groups in the 1970 cohort compared to the 1958 cohort. Although fewer cohort members in the 1970 cohort experienced social housing, and did so at a later age, social housing w

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