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Development of an instrument to assess the impact of an enhanced experiential model on pharmacy students' learning opportunities, skills and attitudes: A retrospective comparative-experimentalist study

Authors
Journal
BMC Medical Education
1472-6920
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
8
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1472-6920-8-17
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Design
  • Education
  • Pharmacology

Abstract

1472-6920-8-17.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Medical Education Open AcceResearch article Development of an instrument to assess the impact of an enhanced experiential model on pharmacy students' learning opportunities, skills and attitudes: A retrospective comparative-experimentalist study Rosemin Kassam*†1, Gary Poole†2 and John B Collins†3 Address: 1Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 2Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and 3Department of Educational Studies, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Email: Rosemin Kassam* - [email protected]; Gary Poole - [email protected]; John B Collins - [email protected] * Corresponding author †Equal contributors Abstract Background: Pharmacy schools across North America have been charged to ensure their students are adequately skilled in the principles and practices of pharmaceutical care. Despite this mandate, a large percentage of students experience insufficient opportunities to practice the activities, tasks and processes essential to pharmaceutical care. The objective of this retrospective study of pharmacy students was to: (1) as "proof of concept", test the overall educational impact of an enhanced advanced pharmacy practice experiential (APPE) model on student competencies; (2) develop an instrument to measure students' and preceptors' experiences; and (3) assess the psychometric properties of the instrument. Methods: A comparative-experimental design, using student and preceptor surveys, was used to evaluate the impact of the enhanced community-based APPE over the traditional APPE model. The study was grounded in a 5-stage learning model: (1) an enhanced learning climate leads to (2) better utilization of learning opportunities, including (3) more frequent student/patient consultation, then to (4) improved skills acquisition, th

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