Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Rhizobacterial induction of systemic resistance in tomato plants: non-specific protection and increase in enzyme activities

Authors
Journal
Biological Control
1049-9644
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
29
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s1049-9644(03)00163-4
Keywords
  • Pseudomonas Syringaepv.Tomato
  • Alternaria Solani
  • Corynespora Cassiicola
  • Stemphilium Solani
  • Oidium Lycopersici
  • Xanthomonas Campestrispv.Vesicatoria
  • Bacillus Cereus
  • Biological Control
  • Rhizobacteria
  • Induced Systemic Resistance
  • Lipoxygenase
  • Phenylalanine Amonia-Lyase
  • Peroxidase
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Rhizobacteria B101R, B212R, and A068R, selected as inducers of systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, were tested individually for biological control of multiple pathogens causing foliar diseases in tomato plants. Greenhouse bioassays were carried with five pathogens— Alternaria solani (early blight), Corynespora cassiicola (foliar blight), Oidium lycopersici (powdery mildew), Stemphilium solani (leaf spot), and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (bacterial spot). The level of control achieved by each rhizobacterium varied with the pathosystem studied. Isolate B101R afforded reduced disease intensity in terms of average number of leaf lesions as compared to the treatment control, protection against A. solani, S. solani, and O. lycopersici. Lipoxygenase, phenylalanine amonia-lyase, and peroxidase activities were estimated spectrophotometrically in extracts of plants grown from seeds that were microbiolized with rhizobacterium B101R, and inoculated with P. syringae pv. tomato. Increases in peroxidase and lipoxygenase activities were detected in foliar extracts from plants whose seeds had been microbiolized, while no increase in phenylalanine amonia-lyase activity was observed.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.