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Inapparent Visual Field Defects in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

Authors
Publisher
Croatian Anthropological Society; [email protected]
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Visual Field Defect
  • Multiple Sclerosis
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

To assess inapparent visual field defects in patients with multiple sclerosis free from optic neuritis. During 5 years period 120 patients with multiple sclerosis were examined at the University Department of Ophthalmology, Zagreb University Hospital Center. They were divided into three groups with 40 patients each: patients with acute unilateral optic neuritis, referred to ophthalmologist and treated with pulsed steroid therapy; patients with subjective feeling of blurred vision, normal visual acuity and no signs of acute optic neuritis; and patients free from subjective signs of visual impairment. Study patients underwent standard ophthalmologic examination and visual field testing in photopia by use of quantitative kinetic Goldmann perimetry. The initial and control examination by visual field testing were performed at least 6 months apart. Study results showed 65% of multiple sclerosis patients to have visual field defects without subjective signs of impaired vision. The most common defects were mild to moderate visual field narrowing with blind spot enlargement and depression from above. The following results were recorded: acute optic neuritis group: normal in 13/40 (32.5%) for the affected eyes and 27/40 (67.5%) for fellow eyes; mild visual field narrowing in 4/40 (10%) for the affected eyes and 10/40 (25%) for fellow eyes; moderate visual field narrowing with blind spot enlargement in 14/40 (35%) for the affected eyes and 1/40 (2.5%) for fellow eyes; and paracentral and arcuate scotomata in 9/40 (22.5%) for the affected eyes and 2/40 (5%) for fellow eyes; subjective symptom group: normal in 8/40 (20%) for the affected eyes and 11/40 (27.5%) for fellow eyes; mild visual field narrowing in 11/40 (27.5%) for the affected eyes and 16/40 (40%) for fellow eyes; moderate visual field narrowing with blind spot enlargement in 18/40 (45%) for the affected eyes and 10/40 (25%); and paracentral and arcuate scotomata in 3/40 (7.5%) for both affected and fellow eyes; and subjective symptom-free group: normal in 24/80 (30%), mild visual field narrowing in 22/80 (27.5%) moderate visual field narrowing with blind spot enlargement in 24/80 (30%); and paracentral and arcuate scotomata in 10/80 (12.5%). The presence of subclinical form of optic nerve involvement could be demonstrated in a very early stage of multiple sclerosis by the introduction of visual field testing in the standard examination protocol.

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