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Chemically induced DNA hypomethylation in breast carcinoma cells detected by the amplification of intermethylated sites

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Publisher
BioMed Central
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PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Ecology
  • Geography

Abstract

bcr799.fm Available online http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/6/4/R329 Open AccessVol 6 No 4Research article Chemically induced DNA hypomethylation in breast carcinoma cells detected by the amplification of intermethylated sites Bekim Sadikovic, Thomas R Haines, Darci T Butcher and David I Rodenhiser The London Regional Cancer Centre, London Health Sciences Centre, Child Health Research Institute, and the Departments of Biochemistry, Paediatrics and Oncology, at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada Corresponding author: David I Rodenhiser, [email protected] Received: 26 Nov 2003 Revisions requested: 26 Jan 2004 Revisions received: 10 Feb 2004 Accepted: 31 Mar 2004 Published: 30 Apr 2004 Breast Cancer Res 2004, 6:R329-R337 (DOI 10.1186/bcr799)http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/6/4/R329 © 2004 Sadikovic et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Abstract Introduction Compromised patterns of gene expression result in genomic instability, altered patterns of gene expression and tumour formation. Specifically, aberrant DNA hypermethylation in gene promoter regions leads to gene silencing, whereas global hypomethylation events can result in chromosomal instability and oncogene activation. Potential links exist between environmental agents and DNA methylation, but the destabilizing effects of environmental exposures on the DNA methylation machinery are not understood within the context of breast cancer aetiology. Methods We assessed genome-wide changes in methylation patterns using a unique methylation profiling technique called amplification of intermethylated sites (AIMS). This method generates easily readable fingerprints that represent the investigated cell line's methylation profile, based on the differential cleavage of DNA with methylation-specific

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