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Diagnoses-related procedure bundles in outpatient care – results from a research project using secondary data

Authors
Journal
BMC Health Services Research
1472-6963
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-11-s1-a3
Keywords
  • Meeting Abstract
Disciplines
  • Law
  • Medicine

Abstract

Diagnoses-related procedure bundles in outpatient care – results from a research project using secondary data MEETING ABSTRACT Open Access Diagnoses-related procedure bundles in outpatient care – results from a research project using secondary data N Pfeffer1*, A Weisser1, G Endel1, C Scholler1, A Eisl2, P Filzmoser3 From 27th Patient Classification Systems International (PCSI) Working Conference Montreal, Canada. 19-22 October 2011 Introduction Currently, one aspect of the discussion concerning healthcare reform in Austria focuses on strengthening the provision of ambulatory healthcare. Consequently, legal changes aim at fostering the development of new structures in healthcare (group practices), as well as implementing alternative payment mechanisms for those entities. In 2009, we started a research project in the field of diagnosis-related mechanisms of payment for ambula- tory care. The project focuses on episodes of care for chronic diseases. The main objectives of this project are to show the feasibility of the available administrative healthcare data, to develop a statistical toolkit in order to identify diagnoses-related procedure bundles in ambulatory care, and to calculate costs for the proce- dure bundles. Methods We use a pseudonymous dataset that contains a full record of ambulatory health data as well as hospital data for 2006–2007. The data is linked using a unique patient identifier. When calculating procedure bundles, only costly pro- cedures from outpatient care were included. Therefore, we used descriptive statistics to identify the relevant procedures for each specialty. Diagnoses were obtained from ATC-Codes of prescription data and were assigned to each patient via his or her personal record of medica- tion. We limited our research to a number of common chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, COPD/asthma, dementia). Three different approaches were used to include patients in the data sample: 1. Patients with no other disease than the disease in questio

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