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Inter-hemispheric Comparison of Mid-latitude Lacustrine Archives and High-latitude Ice Cores over the Younger Dryas and the Little Ice Age

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  • Physical
  • Chemical
  • Mathematical & Earth Sciences :: Earth Sciences & Physical Geography [G02]
  • Physique
  • Chimie
  • Mathématiques & Sciences De La Terre :: Sciences De La Terre & Géographie Physique [G02]

Abstract

The isotopic ice cores records from Antarctica and Greenland provide suitable information for climate modelling EGU 2006 – Abstract for the session CL030 Inter-hemispheric Comparison of Mid-latitude Lacustrine Archives and High-latitude Ice Cores over the Younger Dryas and the Little Ice Age X. Boës1, M.F. Loutre2, M. De Batist3, N. Fagel1 1 Clays and Paleoclimate Research Unit URAP, Department of Geology, University of Liège, Belgium. 2 Institut d’astronomie et de géophysique G. Lemaître, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgique. 3 Renard Centre of Marine Geology (RCMG), Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Belgium. * Author for correspondence: [email protected] The ice-core records from Greenland and Antarctica provide some of the most suitable sequences to detect the onset of significant climate changes like the Younger Dryas (YD). In terms of inter-hemispheric comparison, the calibration of the age models is probably the most determinant parameter. In this context, the annual ice layers like in e.g. the GISP2 or Taylor Dome ice cores constitute important calibrated climate data for the assessment of the time responses between the northern and southern hemisphere. However, in order to fully understand the origin and the propagation of significant cold or warm events, it is necessary to include results from paleoclimate research from the mid-latitudes free of ice sheets. In this context the laminated lake sediments can provide long and continuous climate records that can be compared with the polar ice cores. Here, we compare calibrated lake sediment records from the mid-latitudes, i.e. in South America and Eurasia, to calibrated ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica. The age models are established by varve counting, Pb210, Cs137 or 14C data. Two time periods are investigated: the Termination I and the Last Millennium. The first time window includes the last cold event of the Pleistocene (i.e. t

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