Affordable Access

Effect of capsaicin on the release of substance P from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro.

Publication Date
  • Research Article
  • Education
  • Medicine


.org Page ( 1 ) AAOS does not endorse any treatments, procedures, products, or physicians referenced herein. This information is provided as an educational service and is not intended to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specifi c orthopaedic advice or assistance should consult his or her orthopaedic surgeon, or locate one in your area through the AAOS “Find an Orthopaedist” program on Copyright ©1995-2013 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Shoulder Joint Replacement Although shoulder joint replacement is less common than knee or hip replacement, it is just as successful in relieving joint pain. Shoulder replacement surgery was fi rst performed in the United States in the 1950s to treat severe shoulder fractures. Over the years, shoulder joint replacement has come to be used for many other painful conditions of the shoulder, such as diff erent forms of arthritis. Today, about 53,000 people in the U.S. have shoulder replacement surgery each year, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. This compares to more than 900,000 Americans a year who have knee and hip replacement surgery. If nonsurgical treatments like medications and activity changes are no longer helpful for relieving pain, you may want to consider shoulder joint replacement surgery. Joint replacement surgery is a safe and eff ective procedure to relieve pain and help you resume everyday activities. Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to have shoulder joint replacement surgery, this article will help you understand more about this valuable procedure. Anatomy Your shoulder is made up of three bones: your upper arm bone (humerus), your shoulder blade (scapula), and your collarbone (clavicle). The shoulder is a ball-and- socket joint: The ball, or head, of your upper arm bone fi ts into a shallow socket in your shoulder blade. This socket is called the glenoid. The surfaces of the bones where they tou

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.