Affordable Access

A Handbook of International Trade in Services

Authors
Disciplines
  • Communication
  • Computer Science
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Medicine

Abstract

International trade and investment in services are an increasingly important part of global commerce. Advances in information and telecommunication technologies have expanded the scope of services that can be traded cross-border. Many countries now allow foreign investment in newly privatized and competitive markets for key infrastructure services, such as energy, telecommunications, and transport. More and more people are travelling abroad to consume tourism, education, and medical services, and to supply services ranging from construction to software development. In fact, services are the fastest growing components of the global economy, and trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) in services have grown faster than in goods over the past decade and a half. International transactions, however, continue to be impeded by policy barriers, especially to foreign investment and the movement of service-providing individuals. Developing countries in particular are likely to benefit significantly from further domestic liberalization and the elimination of barriers to their exports. In many instances, income gains from a reduction in protection to services may be far greater than from trade liberalization in goods. In light of the increasing importance of international trade in services and the inclusion of services issues on the agendas of the multilateral, regional and bilateral trade negotiations, there is an obvious need to understand the economic implications of services trade and liberalization. A Handbook of International Trade in Services provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject, making it an essential reference for trade officials, policy advisors, analysts, academics, and students. Beginning with an overview on the key issues in trade in services and discussion of the GATS, the book then looks at trade negotiations in the service sector, the barriers to trade in services, and concludes by looking at a number of specific service sectors, such as financial services, e-commerce, health services, and the temporary movement of workers. Contributors to this volume - Rudolf Adlung, Trade in Services Division of the WTO Secretariat, World Trade Organization Jonathan D. Aronson, University of Southern California Chantal Blouin, Chercheure Principale, Commerce et Developpement, Ottawa, Canada Patricio Contreras, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Washington DC Brian Copeland, University of British Columbia Peter F. Cowhey, University of California, San Diego Barbara d'Andrea, International Trade Statistics Section, WTO Alan V. Deardorff, University of Michigan Philippa Dee, Australian National University Shantayanan Devarajan, Chief Economist, South Asia Region, World Bank Wendy Dobson, University of Toronto Nick Drager, Department of Ethics, Trade, Human Rights and Law, World Health Organization Roberto Echandi, Small Economy Trade & Investment Center (SETIC), Diplomatic Institute, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica Geza Feketekuty, Institute for Trade and Commercial Diplomacy David P. Fidler, Indiana University School of Law Christopher Findlay, University of Adelaide Carsten Fink, International Trade Team, World Bank Institute, World Bank Marc H. Juhel, Transport and Logistics Adviser, World Bank Joscelyn Magdeleine, International Trade Statistics Section, WTO Flavio Marega, Embassy of Brazil, Washington DC Aaditya Mattoo, International Trade Group, Development Research Group World Bank Andreas Maurer, International Trade Statistics Section, WTO Yann Marcus, International Trade Statistics Section, WTO Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Migration Policy Institute Carlos S. Primo Braga, International Trade Department, World Bank Thomas F. Rutherford, Ann Arbor, Michigan Pierre Sauve, London School of Economics and Political Science Richard Smith, University of East Anglia Sherry Stephenson, Department of Trade, Tourism and Competitiveness, Executive Secretariat for Integral Development (SEDI), Organization of American States (OAS) Robert M. Stern, University of Michigan David Tarr, Development Research Group, World Bank Yan Wang, Trade Team, World Bank Institute Obie Whichard, Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce L. Alan Winters, Development Research Group, World Bank Gianni Zanini, World Bank Institute, World Bank

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.