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Automatic analyser/computer system for adaptive control of phosphate concentration during fermentation

Authors
Publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Publication Date
Volume
7
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1155/s1463924685000049
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Economics
  • Medicine

Abstract

Journal of Automatic Chemistry, Volume 7, Number (January-March 1985), pages 8-19 Automatic analyser/computer system for adaptive control of phosphate concentration during fermentation M. P6cs, L. Szigeti, Gy. Lovrecz, E. Pungor Jr., L. Nyeste and F. Hol16 University of Technical Sciences, Budapest, Department ofAgricultural Chemical Technology, H-1521 Budapest, Gellgrt tgr 4., Hungary employed only for the control of slow processes where concentration changes slowly; fermentation processes are slow (most of the variables have longer response times than AAs). Introduction The growing demand for economical methods for opti- mally controlling fermentation means that more informa- tion is needed about the process. The scarcity of information about various chemical and biochemical activities during fermentation is currently one of the limiting factors to efficient control. Indirect methods, such as measurement of the rate of carbon dioxide production or oxygen uptake, have been suggested [1, 2 and 3] for estimating biomass, substrate and product concentration. At the present there are only few direct measuring instruments, for example the on-line coupled gas chromatograph, mass spectrometer, cytofluorograph and automatic analyser, because no simple sterilizable sensors are available. They all have limited applications, and for the measurement of low-volatility components only the automatic analyser (AA) seems appropriate. Sampling is a special problem when monitoring fermen- tation: the solid substrates and mycelial organisms often used in industrial broths make it difficult. Continuous dialysis has successfully been used to remove solids while measuring small molecules [4 and 5], but dialysis cannot be used for large molecules (enzymes for example). The authors have developed an automatic analyser based on continuous dialysis for general application; it has been tested for inorganic phosphate concentration control during fermentation. The present paper reports on how the system can be applied during a

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