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Computer -based imagery strategy enhances learning comparative anatomy

Authors
Publisher
Purdue University
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Biology
  • Anatomy|Health Sciences
  • Education|Biology
  • Veterinary Science
Disciplines
  • Education
  • Medicine

Abstract

This research used quantitative and qualitative approaches to investigate the effectiveness of computer-based interactive imagery strategy and its components to support and enhance the learning of veterinary anatomy. The research also assessed the students' acceptance of the utilization of interactive imagery and their reactions toward the interactive imagery strategy components. Participants were two classes of freshman veterinary students and one class of veterinary technology students. ^ The first study indicated that computer-based interactive realistic images, computer-based interactive black and white line drawings, and the combination of computer-based interactive realistic images and computer-based interactive black and white line drawings were effective in learning anatomical structures and to identify them in real specimens. Students showed no preference to learn from interactive black and white drawings alone. ^ Results from the second study reflected strong acceptance and positive attitude toward self-directed computer-based instruction that utilized interactive imagery in teaching and learning anatomy. Students' perceived interactive imagery as an effective strategy that helped them learn anatomical concepts. They also identified the real images, use of color as part of the labeling format, dynamic labeling, and multiple key views of images as the important characteristics of effective computer-based interactive images. ^ In the third study there was no significant difference between computer-based dynamic labeling and computer-based static labeling in the immediate recall of anatomical information as measured by students' achievement scores. Realistic images, use of color as part of labeling, presence of multiple key views, and dynamic labeling were identified as the important components of computer-based interactive imagery. ^ The fourth study indicated that there was no significant difference between computer-based interactive imagery and paper-based static imagery in the immediate recall of anatomical information as measured by the students' achievement scores. However, students perceived computer-based interactive imagery as a better strategy than paper-based static imagery in the assimilation of anatomical information. Realistic images, use of color as part of labeling format, multiple key views with component emphasis, and dynamic labeling are the important factors that help students learn anatomical concepts. The combinations of realistic images and multiple key views, and realistic images and use of color as part of labeling were the effective important combinations. ^

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