Affordable Access

Publisher Website

S8-3. Attempts to selectively and quantitatively measure cerebral hemoglobin with TRSdoi="10.1016/j.clinph.2013.02.043" aid="2006620.17"

Authors
Journal
Clinical Neurophysiology
1388-2457
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
124
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinph.2013.02.043
Disciplines
  • Design
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine
  • Physics

Abstract

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), which was originally designed for clinical monitoring of tissue oxygenation, has been developing into a useful tool for neuroimaging studies, whereas the central issue of NIRS, difficulty in selective and quantitative measurement of cerebral hemoglobin (Hb), remains to be solved. In continuous wave measurements, multi-distance probe arrangement and mathematical approaches, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA), are effective for selective detection of cerebral Hb changes, but are insufficient for quantitative measurements. By using time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), we have been developing some approaches to these issues: (1) the method with analytical solutions of the diffusion equation, (2) the method with spatially resolved and time-resolved reflectances, (3) time-segmented analysis of time-resolved reflectances and (4) diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Among them, DOT, which allows 3-D quantitative imaging of optical properties, is thought to be the most promising for solving the central issue. However, the image quality of DOT is still low, because the inverse problems are usually nonlinear, ill-posed, and underdetermined due to the diffusive nature of the photon migration. In this symposium, I first summarize our approaches, and then describe the current status and future prospects of DOT.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.