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McTaggart and the unreality of time.

Authors
Publisher
Kluwer
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Disciplines
  • Education
  • Philosophy

Abstract

Durham Research Online Deposited in DRO: 07 October 2009 Version of attached file: Accepted Version Peer-review status of attached file: Peer-reviewed Citation for published item: Ingthorsson, R. D. (1998) ’McTaggart and the unreality of time.’, Axiomathes., 9 (3). pp. 287-306. Further information on publisher’s website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02681655 Publisher’s copyright statement: The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com Additional information: Use policy The full-text may be used and/or reproduced, and given to third parties in any format or medium, without prior permission or charge, for personal research or study, educational, or not-for-profit purposes provided that: • a full bibliographic reference is made to the original source • a link is made to the metadata record in DRO • the full-text is not changed in any way The full-text must not be sold in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders. Please consult the full DRO policy for further details. Durham University Library, Stockton Road, Durham DH1 3LY, United Kingdom Tel : +44 (0)191 334 3042 — Fax : +44 (0)191 334 2971 http://dro.dur.ac.uk Reference: Axiomathes 9(3): 287-306, 1998 (this is authors copy of original) MCTAGGART AND THE UNREALITY OF TIME Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson John M.E. McTaggart’s (1866-1925) famous argument for the unreality of time really is a peculiar artefact in the history of philosophy. Despite that McTaggart’s conclusion has been generally rejected, his views on tense has been widely accepted, e.g. in modern tense-logic.1 His terms for the different ways events appear to be positioned in time, the A- and B-series, have even come to be used to characterise the two dominating views in the philosophy of time today: the A- and B-view of time, or as is often said, the tensed and tenseless view of time. McTaggart distinguished between two ways that events appear to be positioned in time and cl

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