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Where Are We to Be in These Times? The Place of Chronic Disease Prevention in Community Health Promotion

Authors
Journal
Preventing Chronic Disease
1545-1151
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Essay
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Preventing Chronic Disease VOLUME 4: NO. 3 JULY 2007 Where Are We to Be in These Times? The Place of Chronic Disease Prevention in Community Health Promotion ESSAY Suggested citation for this article: Wilson KM, Satterfield DW. Where are we to be in these times? The place of chronic disease prevention in community health promo- tion. Prev Chronic Dis [serial online] 2007 Jul [date cited]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2007/jul/07_ 0014.htm. In guiding public health strategists to promote com- munity health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), the National Expert Panel on Community Health Promotion raised the knotty issue of the role of chronic disease pre- vention in community health promotion (1). The panel acknowledged the complexity of their recommendations to impact overall health — including the health of 46 mil- lion Americans who lack health insurance (2) — through multiple environments and policies. Nevertheless, panel members urged NCCDPHP and CDC to catalyze new relationships and expand its role as a standard-bearer and broker of public health practice to engage decision mak- ers at local, state, national, and societal levels in creating healthier environments. The authors’ immediate response was to say that the health of the individual must be seen as linked to the health of the community more comprehensively than by focusing on a single chronic disease. Yet public health workers cannot abandon people who are ill from chronic diseases or conditions by reducing the research and public health practice that would help them improve. The authors concluded that the role of chronic disease prevention in community health promotion is as complex as the panel’s recommendations. Through modifications in surveillance, intervention development and delivery, and collaboration with others, those of us in public health can work to inte-

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