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Appendix A. Merged Mortality and Population Schedules from the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1850 and 1860

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Appendix A. Merged Mortality and Population Schedules from the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1850 and 1860 This PDF is a selection from a published volume from the National Bureau of Economic Research Volume Title: Health and Labor Force Participation over the Life Cycle: Evidence from the Past Volume Author/Editor: Dora L. Costa, editor Volume Publisher: University of Chicago Press Volume ISBN: 0-226-11618-2 Volume URL: http://www.nber.org/books/cost03-1 Conference Date: February 2-3, 2001 Publication Date: January 2003 Title: Appendix A. Merged Mortality and Population Schedules from the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1850 and 1860 Author: Joseph P. Ferrie URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c9637 Appendix A Merged Mortality and Population Schedules from the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1850 and 1860 Joseph P. Ferrie 319 The data were constructed to take advantage of the information on dece- dents in the mortality schedules and on survivors in the population sched- ules. These schedules were filled out by census marshals as they went from household to household. After the information on the living family mem- bers was inserted into the population schedule, the household was to re- port information on any deaths that had occurred in the twelve months preceding the census for insertion into the mortality schedules. The popu- lation schedules record each individual’s place of residence (state, county, township), name, age, sex, race, marital status, occupation, wealth (real es- tate in both 1850 and 1860; personal wealth as well in 1860), birthplace, lit- eracy, school attendance, and disability. The mortality schedules record each individual’s name, age, sex, race, marital status, occupation, cause of death, month of death, and number of days ill before death, as well as the location (state, county, township) of the family that reported the death. Two data sets were constructed by merging these sources. Males Aged Twenty and Over in Fifty Rural Counties in 1850 Fifty counties wer

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