Affordable Access

The neuro-ophthalmology of HIV-AIDS review of Neurobehavioral HIV Medicine

Authors
Publisher
Dove Press
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Neurobehavioral Hiv Medicine
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Padmaja Sudhakar,1 Sachin Kedar,1,2 Joseph R Berger1,31Departments of Neurology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA; 2Departments of Ophthalmology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA; 3Departments of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA Abstract: Neuro-ophthalmic problems are known to occur both in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS. Central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and malignancies such as lymphoma are the major source of these problems but some result from the direct effect of the virus on the CNS. Both the afferent visual pathway and efferent ocular motor system may be affected. Neuro-ophthalmic signs may sometimes be the initial manifestation of AIDS. A variety of neuro-ophthalmic manifestations may be encountered in the same patient. Several large studies on the ophthalmic features of AIDS have included neuro-ophthalmic manifestations in their series. However dedicated comprehensive review articles on this subject are few. Despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuro-ophthalmic manifestations still remain a problem in HIV. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the neuro-ophthalmic sequelae of AIDS.Keywords: HIV, AIDS, ophthalmology, eye, pupil, cranial nerve, ocular motility, visual loss

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments

More articles like this

HIV/AIDS Review.

on Radiologic technology 2013

Neurobehavioral correlates of perceived mental and...

on The Journal of neuropsychiatry... 1998

Neuroimaging of HIV and AIDS related illnesses: a...

on Frontiers in Bioscience Jan 01, 2004

Road medicine and HIV/AIDS.

on The Lancet Sep 27, 2003
More articles like this..