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Journalistic ethics as field strategies: a particular case of the possible

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  • Pn Literature (General)
  • Bj Ethics
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  • Linguistics
  • Philosophy

Abstract

Microsoft Word - Cover - Markham.doc Tim Markham Journalistic ethics as field strategies: a particular case of the possible Conference paper Original citation: Originally presented at [email protected] Fifth Anniversary Conference, 21st - 23rd September 2008, LSE, London. This version available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/23353/ Available in LSE Research Online: June 2009 © 2009 Tim Markham LSE has developed LSE Research Online so that users may access research output of the School. Copyright © and Moral Rights for the papers on this site are retained by the individual authors and/or other copyright owners. Users may download and/or print one copy of any article(s) in LSE Research Online to facilitate their private study or for non-commercial research. You may not engage in further distribution of the material or use it for any profit-making activities or any commercial gain. You may freely distribute the URL (http://eprints.lse.ac.uk) of the LSE Research Online website. MARKHAM | JOURNALISTIC ETHICS AS FIELD STRATEGIES 1 Journalistic Ethics as Field Strategies: A Particular Case of the Possible Tim Markham Birkbeck, University of London Panel: Distant Suffering Media, Communication and Humanity [email protected] Fifth Anniversary Conference London School of Economics 21-23 September 2008 Introduction This paper draws on a discourse analysis of interviews with British and American war correspondents to investigate the extent to which media ethics should be seen as purely strategic, or whether there can be a defensible deontological ethical framework. It begins from the Bourdieusian proposition that in a professional field, morality can only exist if it is supported by structures and mechanisms which give people an interest in morality. The empirical evidence suggests that rather than cynically calculating how best to perform or project journalistic ethics, reporters tend to internalise and interpret ethical symbolic economies as common-se

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