Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Protraction of the maxillofacial complex

Authors
Journal
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
0889-5406
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
98
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0889-5406(90)70031-7
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the orthopedic effects of reverse headgear therapy in children with skeletal Class III malocclusions. Data based on pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of seven boys and five girls, ages 4 through 14 years, were used. Comparison of the pretreatment and posttreatment cephalograms revealed a significant ( p < 0.05) increase in the SNA angle that indicated the maxilla was positioned farther forward after reverse headgear therapy. Both the maxillary and the mandibular effective lengths increased significantly from pretreatment to posttreatment, as did anterior and posterior total face height. These linear increases are most likely a reflection of growth rather than a direct result of the therapy. There was no significant change in the anteroposterior position of the mandible, although there was a tendency for the mandibular plane angle and the gonial angle to decrease. The results of this study indicate that maxillary protraction with a reverse headgear should be considered an alternative to orthognathic surgery in the treatment of children and adolescents with skeletal Class III malocclusion characterized by maxillary retrognathism.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments

More articles like this

Protraction of the maxillofacial complex.

on American Journal of Orthodonti... July 1990

A study of holographic interferometry on the initi...

on American Journal of Orthodonti... Jan 01, 1997

A study of holographic interferometry on the initi...

on American Journal of Orthodonti... June 1997

Geometric morphometric assessment of treatment eff...

on Journal of oral rehabilitation October 2005
More articles like this..