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Structural behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete members

Authors
Publisher
McGill University
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Engineering - Civil

Abstract

A series of full-scale axial compression tests was conducted on RC and SFRC columns. The specimens, which were detailed with varying amounts of transverse reinforcement, were cast using a self-consolidating concrete (SCC) mix that contained various quantities of fibres. The results demonstrate that the addition of fibres leads to improvements in load carrying capacity and post-peak response. The results also show that the addition of steel fibres can partially substitute for the transverse reinforcement in RC columns, thereby improving constructability while achieving significant confinement. Analytical models for the prediction of the load-strain response of SFRC columns are presented and validated with the experimental results. The tensile behaviour of SFRC members reinforced with a single reinforcing bar was also studied. The results indicate that the addition of fibres leads to improvements in tension stiffening and crack control. A procedure for predicting the response of tension members, accounting for the presence of fibres, is presented. Experimental investigations were carried out on a series of RC and SFRC beams. The effects of steel fibres on shear capacity, failure mechanism and crack control are studied. The results show that the addition of steel fibres leads to improvements in load carrying capacity and can lead to a more ductile failure. A simple procedure that can be used to predict the ultimate shear capacity of SFRC beams is introduced and validated using results from other researchers.

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