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Effects of increased systemic inflammation and central obesity on arterial stiffness in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Authors
Journal
Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
1933-1711
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
6
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2012.04.003
Keywords
  • Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
  • Arterial Stiffness
  • Inflammation
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with increasing arterial stiffness. We studied the effects of inflammation on different measurements of arterial stiffness in NAFLD. We recruited 80 patients with NAFLD and 40 control subjects. Both compliance index (CI) and stiffness index (SI) were measured. Patients with NAFLD had significantly lower CI (3.8 ± 2.1 vs 4.9 ± 2.9 units; P < .05) and higher SI (8.5 ± 2.4 vs 7.1 ± 1.5 m/s; P < .05) than the controls. Patients with NAFLD were further divided into 2 groups according to the median level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). The CI was significantly lower in patients with NAFLD with high hs-CRP than in those with low hs-CRP (3.2 ± 1.7 vs 4.4 ± 2.5 units; P < .05); however, SI was not statistically different. We further found that waist circumference (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.01−1.13; P < .05) was the only independent factor that predicted low CI (<median value) in patients with NAFLD. Central obesity was an important determinant both for increased arterial stiffness and hs-CRP in Patients with NAFLD.

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