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PLEKHA7 Is an Adherens Junction Protein with a Tissue Distribution and Subcellular Localization Distinct from ZO-1 and E-Cadherin

Authors
Journal
PLoS ONE
1932-6203
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Volume
5
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012207
Keywords
  • Research Article
  • Biochemistry/Macromolecular Assemblies And Machines
  • Biochemistry/Protein Chemistry
  • Cell Biology/Cell Adhesion
  • Cell Biology/Cytoskeleton
  • Cell Biology/Morphogenesis And Cell Biology
Disciplines
  • Biology

Abstract

The pleckstrin-homology-domain-containing protein PLEKHA7 was recently identified as a protein linking the E-cadherin-p120 ctn complex to the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here we characterize the expression, tissue distribution and subcellular localization of PLEKHA7 by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and northern blotting in mammalian tissues. Anti-PLEKHA7 antibodies label the junctional regions of cultured kidney epithelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy, and major polypeptides of Mr ∼135 kDa and ∼145 kDa by immunoblotting of lysates of cells and tissues. Two PLEKHA7 transcripts (∼5.5 kb and ∼6.5 kb) are detected in epithelial tissues. PLEKHA7 is detected at epithelial junctions in sections of kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine, retina, and cornea, and its tissue distribution and subcellular localization are distinct from ZO-1. For example, PLEKHA7 is not detected within kidney glomeruli. Similarly to E-cadherin, p120 ctn, β-catenin and α-catenin, PLEKHA7 is concentrated in the apical junctional belt, but unlike these adherens junction markers, and similarly to afadin, PLEKHA7 is not localized along the lateral region of polarized epithelial cells. Immunoelectron microscopy definitively establishes that PLEKHA7 is localized at the adherens junctions in colonic epithelial cells, at a mean distance of 28 nm from the plasma membrane. In summary, we show that PLEKHA7 is a cytoplasmic component of the epithelial adherens junction belt, with a subcellular localization and tissue distribution that is distinct from that of ZO-1 and most AJ proteins, and we provide the first description of its distribution and localization in several tissues.

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