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Do pediatricians manage influenza differently than internists?

Authors
Journal
BMC Pediatrics
1471-2431
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
8
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2431-8-15
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

1471-2431-8-15.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Pediatrics Open AcceResearch article Do pediatricians manage influenza differently than internists? Michael B Rothberg*1,2, Aleta B Bonner3,4, MH Rajab4,5,6, Barbara W Stechenberg7 and David N Rose1,2 Address: 1Department of Medicine, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA, 2Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX, USA, 4Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA, 5Department of Psychiatry, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX, USA, 6Department of Biostatistics, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX, USA and 7Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA Email: Michael B Rothberg* - [email protected]; Aleta B Bonner - [email protected]; MH Rajab - [email protected]; Barbara W Stechenberg - [email protected]; David N Rose - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Little is known about how pediatricians or internists manage influenza symptoms. Recent guidelines on antiviral prescribing by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) make almost no distinction between adults and children. Our objective was to describe how pediatricians in two large academic medical institutions manage influenza and compare them to internists. Methods: At the end of the 2003–4 influenza season, we conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physician knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding rapid diagnostic testing and use of antiviral therapy for influenza at two large academic medical centers, one in Massachusetts and the other in Texas. We collected data on self-reported demographics, test use, prescribing practices, and beliefs about influenza and anti-influenza drugs. Results: A total of 107 pediatricians and 103 internists completed the survey (response rate of 53%). Compared to inte

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