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Should Policies Be Pursued to Increase the Flow of New Doctorates?

Authors
Disciplines
  • Economics
  • Education

Abstract

Should Policies Be Pursued to Increase the Flow of New Doctorates? This PDF is a selection from an out-of-print volume from the National Bureau of Economic Research Volume Title: Economic Challenges in Higher Education Volume Author/Editor: Charles T. Clotfelter, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Malcolm Getz, and John J. Siegfried Volume Publisher: University of Chicago Press Volume ISBN: 0-226-11050-8 Volume URL: http://www.nber.org/books/clot91-1 Publication Date: January 1991 Chapter Title: Should Policies Be Pursued to Increase the Flow of New Doctorates? Chapter Author: Ronald G. Ehrenberg Chapter URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c6087 Chapter pages in book: (p. 233 - 258) 10 Should Policies Be Pursued to Increase the Flow of New Doctorates? 10.1 Would a Shortage of American Doctorates Really Matter? Suppose that a “shortage” of American doctorates does occur in the future. Would this have a substantial negative effect on academe? To answer this question, one needs to know which types of institutions would be hurt the most by a shortage and the extent to which such a shortage would have an adverse effect on undergraduate education, on the flow of future generations of students into doctoral programs, and on the research productivity of faculty at American colleges and universities. To the extent that doctorates value both their economic well-being and the nonpecuniary conditions of their employment, such as research opportunities and opportunities to teach bright students, the hardest-hit institutions are likely to be those that are relatively low-paying and nonselective. The average faculty salary data presented in Table 6.2 indicate that salaries are lower in comprehensive and baccalaureate institutions than they are in doctoral-level institutions and about the same in two-year and baccalaureate institutions. Within the comprehensive and baccalaureate categories, salaries are lowest at Liberal Arts I1 and Comprehensive I1 institutions. Taken toge

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