Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Stress ethylene evolution: A measure of ozone effects on plants

Authors
Journal
Atmospheric Environment (1967)
0004-6981
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
10
Issue
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0004-6981(76)90204-3

Abstract

Abstract To determine if ethylene evolution by plants was correlated with ozone stress, a range of plant species and cultivars was exposed to varying ozone concentrations. Following exposure, the plants were encapsulated in plastic bags and incubated for up to 22 h. The stress-induced ethylene that accumulated in the bag was monitored and correlated with the effects of ozone on plants. The rate of stress-induced ethylene production (slope parameter B) as a function of ozone concentration was used as a measure of plant sensitivity. Applying this ranking scale, ponderosa pine, eucalyptus and soybean were the most sensitive species; holly, squash and marigold were least sensitive. There was a good correlation between ozone-induced stress ethylene production and foliar injury. However, the coefficient of variability associated with the ethylene determination was substantially less than with the visual injury estimate. The production of stress-induced ethylene generally lasted for less than 48 h following exposure. The measurement of stress ethylene appeared to be a fast, reliable, sensitive and reproducible technique to measure ozone stress on plants.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments

More articles like this

Stress ethylene evolution of bean plants—a paramet...

on Atmospheric Environment (1967) Jan 01, 1981

Effect of repetitive ozone treatment on bean plant...

on Atmospheric Environment (1967) Jan 01, 1982

EFFECTS OF IONIZED AIR AND OZONE ON PLANTS.

on PLANT PHYSIOLOGY October 1937
More articles like this..