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Limbic striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability is associated with non-planning impulsivity in healthy adults after exclusion of potential dissimulators

Authors
Journal
Psychiatry Research Neuroimaging
0925-4927
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
202
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2011.09.011
Keywords
  • Dopamine
  • Personality
  • Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (Bis-11)
  • Impulsivity
  • Positron Emission Tomography
  • Raclopride
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have reported an association between reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability and higher scores on self-report measures of trait impulsivity in healthy adults. However, impulsivity is a multi-faceted construct, and it is unclear which aspect(s) of impulsivity might be driving these associations. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between limbic (ventral) striatal D2/3 receptor availability and individual components of impulsivity (attentional, motor and non-planning) using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and [11C]raclopride PET in 23 healthy volunteers. A partial correlational analysis showed a significant association between non-planning impulsiveness (lack of forethought or ‘futuring’) and limbic D2/3 receptor availability, which was only apparent after the exclusion of potential dissimulators (indexed by high scores on impression management). Our findings suggest that non-planning impulsiveness is associated with individual variation in limbic striatal D2/3 receptor availability and that different facets of impulsivity may have specific neurochemical correlates. Future studies that combine D2/3 receptor imaging with behavioral measures of impulsivity are required to further elucidate the precise relationship between individual components of trait impulsivity and brain dopaminergic function.

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