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Determining Factors for Hospital Discharge Status After Radical Cystectomy in a Large Contemporary Cohort

Authors
Journal
The Journal of Urology
0022-5347
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
185
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2010.08.016
Keywords
  • Urinary Bladder
  • Cystectomy
  • Bladder Neoplasms
  • Patient Discharge
  • Postoperative Care
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine

Abstract

Purpose We describe hospital discharge status in patients after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. We determined factors affecting discharge status. Materials and Methods The 445 patients underwent radical cystectomy for urothelial carcinoma from January 2004 to December 2007. Patients were grouped by hospital discharge status into 1 of 4 groups, including home under self-care without services, home with home health services, subacute, rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility, or hospice/in-hospital mortality. We compared clinical, perioperative and pathological variables in these groups. We also examined the association of discharge status with the hospital readmission rate and 90-day mortality. Results Of the 440 patients 250 (56.8%), 145 (32.9%), 39 (8.9%) and 6 (1.4%) were in the home without services, home with services, facility and mortality groups, respectively. On multivariate analysis older age, lower preoperative albumin, unmarried status and higher Charlson comorbidity index were predictors of discharge home with services while older age, poor preoperative exercise tolerance and longer hospital stay predicted discharge to a facility. Patients in the facility group were more likely to die within 90 days of surgery than those who returned home independently or with services. There was no difference in the likelihood of rehospitalization. Conclusions Sociodemographic factors, preoperative performance status, and comorbidities and perioperative factors contribute to the discharge decision after radical cystectomy. Some subgroups can be predicted to have increased postoperative care needs and may be appropriate targets for disposition planning preoperatively.

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