Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Molecular, physiological and clinical aspects of the iron storage protein ferritin

Authors
Journal
The Veterinary Journal
1090-0233
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
178
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2007.07.006
Keywords
  • Iron
  • Iron Reduction Therapy
  • Ferritin
  • Ferritin-Binding Protein
  • Oxidative Stress
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Oxidative stress is a major factor in inflammatory, malignant and metabolic diseases in domestic and farm animals. Oxidative stress-mediated damage depends on the level of cellular and total body iron status because an excess iron (Fe 2+) pool produces the most harmful free radicals (hydroxyls) through the Fenton reaction. Ferritin is a ubiquitous and conserved iron storage protein that plays a central role in iron metabolism and has the dual function of storing iron in bioavailable and non-toxic forms. Intracellular ferritin synthesis is controlled at translational and transcriptional levels in both an iron-dependent and an iron-independent manner. Ferritin is also found in extracellular fluids such as serum, synovial fluids and milk. Although serum ferritin is a sensitive indicator of body iron stores, the extracellular ferritins are elevated in inflammatory or malignant disease. Circulating ferritin interacts with ferritin-binding protein to form a complex, which is rapidly cleared from the body. This review describes recent research of physiological and clinical significance of ferritin and its application to future veterinary medicine.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.