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Electric Signalling during Aggressive Behaviour in Mormyrus rume (Mormyridae, Teleostei)

Authors
Publisher
Springer Verlag
Publication Date
Keywords
  • 590 Tiere (Zoologie)
Disciplines
  • Communication

Abstract

Electric signalling during aggressive behaviour in <Emphasis Type="Italic">Mormyrus rume </Emphasis> (mormyridae, teleostei) from R7+R8) which was found in behavioral experiments by Kirschfeld [4] might thus be due to R7. Supported by National Science Foundation Grants No. GB30733 and BMS 74-21712. Received August 14, 1975 1. Eckert, H. : Kybernetik 9, 145 (1971) 2. McCann, G.D., Arnett, D.W. : J. Gen. Physiol. 59, 534 (1972) 3. Harris, W., Stark, W.H., Walker, J.A. : J. Physiol. (in press) 4. Kirschfeld, K., Lutz, B. : Personal communication 5. Snyder, A.W., Pask, C. : J. Comp. Physiol. 84, 59 (1973) 6. Langer, H., Thorell, B. : Exp. Cell Res. 41, 673 (1966) Electric Signalling during Aggressive Behaviour in Mormyrus fume (Mormyridae, Teleostei) Bernd Kramer* Laboratoire de Physiologie Nerveuse, D~partement de Neurophysiotogie Sensorielle, C.N.R.S. Gif-sur-Yvette, France, and Universitiit Konstanz, Fachbereich Biologie, Konstanz, Federal Republic of Germany In the mormyrid fish Gnathonemus petersii, rapid discharge rate accelerations and complex discharge patterns associated * Present address: Universit~t Konstanz, Fachbereich Biologie, D-7750 Konstanz, Postfach 7733, Federal Republic of Germany. 0.08 - with butts, approaches, lateral displays, and fleeing behaviour were described (see [1 - 4]). There exists considerable evidence now that the electric organ may be used to communicate socially relevant signals to other individuals (additional liter- ature in [5, 6]). The purpose of the present report is to furnish information on agga'ession-related electrical displays in another mormyrid fish species, Mormyrus rume. For methods, refer to [2]. Since there does not exist a method to reliably separate the discharges of two freely moving M. rume close in physical size and hence pulse amplitude, a closely related, sympatric- ally living [2] mormyrid, G. petersii, was used to elicit attacks by the M. rume. The experiments were made wi

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