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U-0038

Authors
Publisher
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Ku Klux Klan (1915- )--Alabama
  • Catholic Schools--Alabama--Birmingham
  • School Integration--Alabama--Birmingham
  • High School Students--Alabama
  • Discrimination In Education--Alabama--Birmingham
  • High School Teachers
  • Birmingham Public Schools (Birmingham
  • Ala.)
Disciplines
  • Education
  • Law
  • Political Science

Abstract

Family background; growing up in Birmingham, Ala., and going to Catholic school; memories of segregation as a child; her mother, an educator, registering to vote in a maid's outfit because professionally-dressed blacks could not register to vote; segregated services at Loveman's, the department store; traveling to New York as a child and witnessing a race riot -- racism as a national issue; wanting to go to college; attending Talladega -- studying art and photography; Odessa Woolfolk; finishing college at West Virginia; a master's degree at New York University -- the state of Alabama would pay for blacks to go to graduate school outside of the state, but she wont take the money; working in Annapolis, Maryland, racism in the Catholic Church; teaching at Western High School in Birmingham beginning 1957; P. D. Jackson, principal of Western; Fred Shuttlesworth trying to register his children in at all-white Phillips, rather than Parker. Carver High School -- Shuttlesworth School; moving to Hayes High School in 1960; A.C. Dickerson; klan protest of school desegregation in 1963; refusing to move to integrate the faculty of another school; resegregation of Phillips high school by 1972; some white children at Hayes High School; on white student's long hair; remembering white students and white teachers; some teachers not being able to discipline the black children, too much stress; not being invited to attend her co-worker's wedding because his bride's white family wouldn't allow it; teachers working in an integrated setting up then at three-thirty we go our separate ways; teaching summer school experiences; white kids sitting together at the back of the classroom; the Children's Crusade, spring 1963, when black children walked out of school to join the mass demonstrations; children walking out of her classroom; teacher's contract modified to try to discourage them from allowing the children to walk out and demonstrate; importance of children for the movement; looking back and seeing that some whites were concerned at the time; fear for her own daughter's safety after the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing; her daughter suffering discrimination at John Carroll High School in 1977 trying to join the cheerleading squad; prejudice among Catholics; positive impact of the civil rights movement; the need for reconciliation for Birmingham; but bad memories of the sixties, particularly the bombing; having a hard time obeying the selective buying campaign in 1963; Britts v. Newberry's department store; goals of school desegregation; Richard Walker, Cleopatra Goree; the civil rights movement in Birmingham; the recent bombing trials; communists in Alabama; Hispanic students in the Birmingham schools today; daughter a principal in the school system; joining the NAACP; the increasing lack of diversity in Birmingham Public Schools through the late 1990s; affluent students moving out of the system.

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