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Educational and ecological correlates of IQ: A cross-national investigation

Authors
Journal
Intelligence
0160-2896
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
33
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2005.01.001
Disciplines
  • Agricultural Science
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Social Sciences

Abstract

Abstract The new paradigm of evolutionary social science suggests that humans adjust rapidly to changing economic conditions, including cognitive changes in response to the economic significance of education. This research tested the predictions that cross-national differences in IQ scores would be positively correlated with education and negatively correlated with an agricultural way of life. Regression analysis found that much of the variance in IQ scores of 81 countries (derived from [Lynn, R., & Vanhanen, T. (2002). IQ and the wealth of nations. Westport, CT: Praeger] ) was explained by enrollment in secondary education, illiteracy rates, and by the proportion of agricultural workers. Cross-national IQ scores were also related to low birth weights. These effects remained with national wealth, infant mortality, and geographic continent controlled (exception secondary education) and were largely due to variation within continents. Cross-national differences in IQ scores thus suggest that increasing cognitive demands in developed countries promote an adaptive increase in cognitive ability.

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