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Within-session changes in therapist and client behaviors during an alcohol brief motivational intervention for young men

Authors
Journal
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
1940-0632
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1940-0640-8-s1-a30
Keywords
  • Meeting Abstract
Disciplines
  • Linguistics
  • Medicine

Abstract

Within-session changes in therapist and client behaviors during an alcohol brief motivational intervention for young men MEETING ABSTRACT Open Access Within-session changes in therapist and client behaviors during an alcohol brief motivational intervention for young men Jacques Gaume1,2*, Molly Magill1, Richard Longabaugh1, Nicolas Bertholet2, Gerhard Gmel2, Jean-Bernard Daeppen2 From International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drugs (INEBRIA) Meeting 2013 Rome, Italy. 18-20 September 2013 Brief motivational intervention (BMI) has shown promis- ing results among young adults, but its underlying mechanisms are seldom investigated. Analyzing the dynamic processes of therapist and client behaviors throughout the session might help to better understand mechanisms operative during BMI. We used data from a BMI randomized controlled trial for heavy drinking among non-treatment seeking Swiss young men. The par- ent study found significantly lowered drinking in the BMI group (N=179) compared to a control group receiving no intervention (N=182) 3 months later. In the present study, we conducted psycholinguistic coding of 174 BMI using the Motivational Interviewing (MI) Skill Code (MISC 2.1; Miller et al. 2008) and then divided the sessions in thirds to examine within-session processes across time. Alcohol outcome was dichotomized into a “changers” group (base- line to 3-month difference greater than the mean of the control group) and a “non-changers” group. We then tested for interactions between time (thirds) and outcome group in GEE models accounting for within-person corre- lations across repeated (time) measures. Interactions were not significant for therapist frequency of MI-consistent behaviors, percent of open questions, and ratio of reflec- tions to questions, but were significant for the frequency of MI-inconsistent behaviors (MIIN) and the percent of therapist reflections that were complex. Regarding client change talk, interactions were significant only fo

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