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Occupationless health. "I couldn't stand it any more": suicide and unemployment.

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PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • History
  • Medicine
  • Psychology

Abstract

Understanding Suicide Fact Sheet 2010 www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention Why is suicide a public health problem? Who is at risk for suicide? Suicide occurs when a person ends their life. It is the 11th leading cause of death among Americans. But suicide deaths are only part of the problem. More people survive suicide attempts than actually die. They are often seriously injured and need medical care. Most people feel uncomfortable talking about suicide. Often, victims are blamed. Their friends, families, and communities are left devastated. • More than 34,000 people kill themselves each year.1 • More than 376,000 people with self-inflicted injuries are treated in emergency rooms each year.1 Suicide affects everyone, but some groups are at higher risk than others. Men are about 4 times more likely than women to die from suicide.1 However, 3 times more women than men report attempting suicide.2 In addition, suicide rates are high among middle aged and older adults. Several factors can put a person at risk for attempting or committing suicide. But, having these risk factors does not always mean that suicide will occur. Risk factors for suicide include: • Previous suicide attempt(s) • History of depression or other mental illness • Alcohol or drug abuse • Family history of suicide or violence • Physical illness • Feeling alone Note: These are only some risk factors. To learn more, go to www.cdc.gov/injury/violenceprevention. How does suicide affect health? Suicide, by definition, is fatal. Those who attempt suicide and survive may have serious injuries like broken bones, brain damage, or organ failure. Also, people who survive often have depression and other mental health problems. Suicide also affects the health of the community. Family and friends of people who commit suicide may feel shock, anger, guilt, and depression. The medical costs and lost wages associated with suicide also take their toll on th

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