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Differences betweenin Vivoandin VitroSensitivity to Imatinib of Bcr/Abl+ Cells Obtained from Leukemic Patients

Authors
Journal
Blood Cells Molecules and Diseases
1079-9796
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
28
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1006/bcmd.2002.0526
Disciplines
  • Biology

Abstract

Abstract ABSTRACT Imatinib mesylate (imatinib) inhibits Bcr/Abl, an oncogenic fusion protein. The in vitro effects of imatinib on BCR/ABL+ leukemic cells include inhibition of Bcr/Abl tyrosine phosphorylation, block of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. The in vivo effects of imatinib were evaluated in 12 CML (chronic myeloid leukemia) patients in blast crisis or accelerated phase who were treated with imatinib. Treatment caused a decrease in spontaneous proliferation of leukemic cells in 10 of 12 evaluable patients and the development of apoptosis in 9 of 11 cases. Imatinib also caused an inhibition of Bcr/Abl autophosphorylation; however, the degree of inhibition obtained in vivo was substantially lower than that achieved in vitro with similar concentrations of imatinib. In seven patients cells could be evaluated at relapse: spontaneous proliferation was no longer inhibited and Bcr/Abl phosphorylation was comparable or superior to that present at the beginning of treatment, before imatinib administration. Plasma imatinib concentrations were not reduced. Leukemic cells obtained at relapse maintained in vitro sensitivity (Bcr/Abl autophosphorylation and proliferation inhibition) to imatinib concentration measured in vivo (3 μM or higher), although a partial resistance to the antiproliferative effects of imatinib was present at low (0.01–0.3 μM) concentrations. In four patients, addition of erythromycin to blood samples obtained at relapse restored imatinib sensitivity in terms of phosphorylation inhibition, indicating that the majority of plasma imatinib was not available to cells and probably bound to α1 acid glycoprotein. These data suggest that measurements of Bcr/Abl kinase activity in peripheral blood samples may represent a more reliable indicator of active concentrations than the measurement of imatinib plasma levels.

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