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Chemical composition of bottom sediments from the Discovery Deep, Red Sea rift zone

Authors
Publisher
PANGAEA
Publication Date
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1594/pangaea.753310
Keywords
  • Ag
  • Al
  • Aluminium
  • Antimony
  • Archive Of Ocean Data
  • Arcod
  • Arsenic
  • As
  • Asv-1540
  • Ba
  • Barium
  • Ca
  • Cadmium
  • Calcium
  • Cd
  • Chromium
  • Co
  • Cobalt
  • Color Desc
  • Color Description
  • Copper
  • Cr
  • Cu
  • Depth
  • Bottom/Max
  • Depth
  • Top/Min
  • Depth Bot
  • Depth Top
  • Dissolved
  • Emission Spectrometry
  • Fe
  • Fe2O3
  • Ga
  • Gallium
  • Ge
  • Germanium
  • Gravity Corer
  • Iron
  • Iron Oxide
  • Fe2O3
  • Lead
  • Li
  • Lithium
  • Magnesium
  • Manganese
  • Manganese Oxide
  • Mg
  • Mn
  • Mno
  • Mo
  • Molybdenite
  • Ni
  • Nickel
  • Pb
  • Red Sea
  • Salt
  • Salt Content
  • Sb
  • Sc
  • Scandium
  • Si
  • Silicon
  • Silver
  • Sn
  • Sr
  • Strontium
  • Thallium
  • Ti
  • Tin
  • Titanium
  • Tl
  • V
  • Vanadium
  • Wet Chemistry
  • Y
  • Yb
  • Ytterbium
  • Yttrium
  • Zinc
  • Zirconium
  • Zn
  • Zr
Disciplines
  • Chemistry
  • Earth Science

Abstract

Hot brines in depressions of the central Red Sea contain thousands of times more iron, manganese and other metals than . After removal of salts, approximately half of sediments from these depressions consists of iron hydroxides and they are enriched in zinc, copper, lead and molybdenum. Hydrothermal deposits with the same complex of metals, located along the coast of the Red Sea, are correlated with faults and may be due to occurrences of Tertiary volcanism. Brines of similar composition are known in the Cheleken Peninsula. Certain geological and geochemical data indicate that such brines are of relatively deep origin.

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