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Percutaneous endotracheal catheterization and intermittent positive pressure breathing in the prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications

Authors
Journal
The American Journal of Surgery
0002-9610
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
115
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0002-9610(68)90154-2

Abstract

Abstract Intermittent positive pressure breathing was an effective mode of treatment in minimizing hypoventilation and assisting the transport and elimination of tracheobronchial secretions. However, percutaneous catheter tracheostomy was found to be much more effective in keeping the tracheobronchial tree clear. The patients treated by catheter tracheostomy, in which the catheter is placed down to the region of the carina, coughed well and in most instances expectorated large amounts of sputum. An impressive advantage of this technic lies in the lack of discomfort to the patient and the facility of his care by both doctor and nurse. The need for the unpleasant procedure of nasotracheal aspiration has been eliminated. This is a very useful tool in the treatment and prevention of postoperative complications.

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