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A Comparison of Laparoscopic and Abdominal Radical Parametrectomy for Cervical or Vaginal Apex Carcinoma and Stage II Endometrial Cancer After Hysterectomy

Authors
Journal
JSLS Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
1086-8089
Publisher
The Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Publication Date
Volume
17
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4293/108680813x13654754535593
Keywords
  • Scientific Papers
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Background and Objective: Radical parametrectomy (RP), performed either abdominally (ARP) or laparoscopically (LRP), is a viable alternative to radiotherapy in treating invasive cervical cancer, vaginal apex cancer, and endometrial cancer that is more advanced than initially suspected after hysterectomy. We carried out a comparative study on intra- and postoperative parameters between the two performed by similarly experienced surgeons. Methods: Forty consecutive patients indicative for RP were reviewed: 22 and 18 underwent ARP and LRP, respectively. Information was collected on demographics, indications for initial and this surgery, tumor characteristics, intra- and postoperative parameters, and complications. The lengths of resected parametrial and vaginal tissues were measured. Results: Compared with ARP, LRP resulted in shorter operative time (200 vs 239 min), less blood loss (627.8 vs 929.5 mL), shorter hospital stay (16.8 vs 19.9 days), and removal of more pelvic lymph nodes (27.4 ± 5.9 vs 23.1 ± 7.1). Although it was not attempted in ARP to remove lymph nodes in the deep obturator space, it was attempted in LRP and one positive node was found. In the ARP cohort there was one case of injury to the small intestine during surgery, whereas in LRP there was one instance of lower urologic fistula after surgery. Conclusion: LRP is superior to ARP in terms of shorter operative time, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stay while still maintaining the completeness of the procedure. It can be safely performed in the hands of experienced surgeons for cervical or vaginal apex carcinoma and stage II endometrial cancer after hysterectomy.

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