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The effect of different combination therapies on oxidative stress markers in HIV infected patients in cameroon

Authors
Journal
AIDS Research and Therapy
1742-6405
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
3
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1742-6405-3-19
Keywords
  • Research
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

The study assessed the effect of some highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART), used in the management of HIV/AIDS in Cameroon, on oxidative stress markers such as malondialdehyde (as TBARs), albumin, protein carbonyl content and protein sulfhydryls groups. 85 HIV positive patients (34.8 ± 9.3 years) were on three different highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART patients). 65 HIV positive patients (32.2 ± 10.9 years) on no treatment (Pre-HAART patients), and 90 non-HIV infected patients (32.6 ± 9.3 years), were the control groups. Plasma TBARs as well as carbonyl levels were significantly higher in HIV patients on HAART compared to pre-HAART patients or non-HIV infected controls. On the other hand, the protein sulfhydryl group content was not different for patients on HAART compared to pre-HAART patients, but both were significantly lower than non-HIV infected controls (P < 0.0001, 0.001). The combination treatment Therapy I [stavudin (80 mg) + Lamivudin (600 mg) + Nevirapin + (400 mg) zidovudin (600 mg)] brought about a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the plasma concentration of protein sulfhydrl groups as well as TBARs compared to Therapy II [stavudin (80 mg) + Lamivudin (300 mg) + nevirapin (400 mg)] or with combination Therapy III of [zidovudine (600 mg) + lamivudin(300 mg) with efavirenz (600 mg)] (P < 0.05). The content of the antioxidant, Vitamin C was lower in the plasma of patients on Therapy I compared to those on Therapy II (P < 0.01) and Therapy III (P < 0.001). HIV infection therefore increases the oxidative stress process, while antiretroviral combination therapy increased protein oxidation as well as the level of oxidative stress already present in HIV infection.

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