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3D printed device including disk-based solid-phase extraction for the automated speciation of iron using the multisyringe flow injection analysis technique.

Authors
  • Calderilla, Carlos1
  • Maya, Fernando2
  • Cerdà, Víctor3
  • Leal, Luz O4
  • 1 Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry-LQA(2), University of the Balearic Islands, Cra.Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Environment and Energy Department, Advanced Materials Research Center, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31136 Chihuahua, Mexico. , (Spain)
  • 2 Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry-LQA(2), University of the Balearic Islands, Cra.Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
  • 3 Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry-LQA(2), University of the Balearic Islands, Cra.Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 Environment and Energy Department, Advanced Materials Research Center, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31136 Chihuahua, Mexico. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Talanta
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
175
Pages
463–469
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.talanta.2017.07.028
PMID: 28842018
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The development of advanced manufacturing techniques is crucial for the design of novel analytical tools with unprecedented features. Advanced manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has been explored for the first time to fabricate modular devices with integrated features for disk-based automated solid-phase extraction (SPE). A modular device integrating analyte oxidation, disk-based SPE and analyte complexation has been fabricated using stereolithographic 3D printing. The 3D printed device is directly connected to flow-based analytical instrumentation, replacing typical flow networks based on discrete elements. As proof of concept, the 3D printed device was implemented in a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system, and applied to the fully automated speciation, SPE and spectrophotometric quantification of Fe in water samples. The obtained limit of detection for total Fe determination was 7ng, with a dynamic linear range from 22ng to 2400ng Fe (3mL sample). An intra-day RSD of 4% (n = 12) and an inter-day RSD of 4.3% (n = 5, 3mL sample, different day with a different disk), were obtained. Incorporation of integrated 3D printed devices with automated flow-based techniques showed improved sensitivity (85% increase on the measured peak height for the determination of total Fe) in comparison with analogous flow manifolds built from conventional tubing and connectors. Our work represents a step forward towards the improved reproducibility in the fabrication of manifolds for flow-based automated methods of analysis, which is especially relevant in the implementation of interlaboratory analysis.

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