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Plantar pressure distribution during gait and running in subjects with chronic ankle instability

Authors
Journal
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
1757-1146
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1757-1146-5-s1-p32
Keywords
  • Poster Presentation
Disciplines
  • Medicine
  • Physics

Abstract

Plantar pressure distribution during gait and running in subjects with chronic ankle instability POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Plantar pressure distribution during gait and running in subjects with chronic ankle instability Roel De Ridder*, Tine Willems, Philip Roosen From 3rd Congress of the International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community Sydney, Australia. 11-13 March 2012 Background Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in athletes. Up to 32% of subjects with an ankle sprain develop residual symptoms labeled as chronic ankle instability (CAI), with a significant impact on the quality of life. In spite of many research the underlying mechan- isms for CAI remain unclear. The foot roll-off pattern of subjects with CAI is one of the factors which may play an important role in recurring ankle sprains and the presence of ‘giving way’ episodes. A more lateral pressure distribu- tion has been suggested in subject with CAI, resulting in higher risk for developing an ankle sprain, but research is limited [1]. Especially in dynamic conditions research is needed. This study includes gait as well as a running * Correspondence: [email protected] Departement of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent, 9000, Belgium Figure 1 Five distinct moments and phases relative to total foot contact [2]. De Ridder et al. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2012, 5(Suppl 1):P32 http://www.jfootankleres.com/content/5/S1/P32 JOURNAL OF FOOT AND ANKLE RESEARCH © 2012 De Ridder et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. condition and investigates plantar pressure distribution on five distinct moments and during 4 phases relative to total foot contact as shown in figure 1 [2]

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