Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Global cooling during the Eocene Oligocene Transition

Authors
Publisher
PANGAEA
Publication Date
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1594/pangaea.771853
Keywords
  • 101-628A
  • 151-913
  • 165-998B
  • 177-1090
  • 29-277
  • 38-336
  • 71-511
  • 95-603D
  • Age
  • Error
  • Age E
  • Age Model
  • Age Model
  • Berggren Et Al (1995) Bksa95
  • Ageprof Dat Des
  • Ageprofile Datum Description
  • Antarctic Ocean/Plateau
  • Colombia Basin
  • Caribbean Sea
  • Composite Core
  • Deep Sea Drilling Project
  • Delta Sst Pre Eot To Post Eot
  • Depth
  • Bottom/Max
  • Depth
  • Top/Min
  • Depth Bot
  • Depth Top
  • Diff
  • Difference
  • Drilling
  • Dsdp
  • Error
  • Absolute
  • Error A
  • Fo = First Occurrence
  • Lo = Last Occurrence
  • T = Top
  • Fad = First Appearance Datum
  • Lad = Last Appearance Datum
  • Glomar Challenger
  • Joides Resolution
  • Label
  • Label 2
  • Leg101
  • Leg151
  • Leg165
  • Leg177
  • Leg29
  • Leg38
  • Leg71
  • Leg95
  • Method
  • Method Comment
  • North Atlantic/Norwegian Sea
  • North Atlantic/Ridge
  • North Atlantic Ocean
  • North Greenland Sea
  • Ocean Drilling Program
  • Odp
  • Odp Sample Designation
  • Paleolatitude
  • Pal-Lat
  • Reference
  • Reference/Source
  • Sample Code/Label
  • Sample Code/Label 2
  • Sea Surface Temperature
  • Annual Mean
  • Sea Surface Temperature
  • Annual Mean Standard Deviation
  • South Atlantic/Plateau
  • South Atlantic Ocean
  • Sst (1-12)
  • Sst (1-2) Std Dev

Abstract

About 34 million years ago, Earth's climate shifted from a relatively ice-free world to one with glacial conditions on Antarctica characterized by substantial ice sheets. How Earth's temperature changed during this climate transition remains poorly understood, and evidence for Northern Hemisphere polar ice is controversial. Here, we report proxy records of sea surface temperatures from multiple ocean localities and show that the high-latitude temperature decrease was substantial and heterogeneous. High-latitude (45 degrees to 70 degrees in both hemispheres) temperatures before the climate transition were ~20°C and cooled an average of ~5°C. Our results, combined with ocean and ice-sheet model simulations and benthic oxygen isotope records, indicate that Northern Hemisphere glaciation was not required to accommodate the magnitude of continental ice growth during this time.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.