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Shifting From the Home to the Market: Accounting for Women's Work in Taiwan, 1965-1995

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  • Economics

Abstract

Microsoft Word - Taiwan for ASS PO LITIC A L EC O N O M Y R ESEA R C H IN STITU TE 10th floor Thompson Hall University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA, 01003-7510 Telephone: (413) 545-6355 Facsimile: (413) 545-2921 Email:[email protected] Website: http://www.umass.edu/peri/ Shifting from the Home to the Market: Accounting for Women's Work in Taiwan, 1965-95 Elissa Braunstein 2001 Number 24 POLITICAL ECONOMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE University of Massachusetts Amherst WORKINGPAPER SERIES SHIFTING FROM THE HOME TO THE MARKET: ACCOUNTING FOR WOMEN’S WORK IN TAIWAN, 1965-95 Elissa Braunstein Political Economy Research Institute 10th Floor, Thompson Hall University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 (413) 545-6355 [email protected] Draft, November 2001 2 SHIFTING FROM THE HOME TO THE MARKET: ACCOUNTING FOR WOMEN’S WORK IN TAIWAN, 1965-95 A. Introduction If one accounts for the shift of women’s work from the household to the market during the course of economic development, what does the trajectory of growth and structural change look like? In this paper, I present an accounting of one such shift by looking at the role of women in Taiwanese growth between 1965 and 1995, a thirty-year stretch when an enviable per capita market growth rate of 6.9 percent, which later came to be called the “East Asian miracle,” was accompanied by large increases in female labor force participation. One way to approach the interdependence of market and nonmarket work is by expanding measures of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to include the value of nonmarket production. The problem of the underestimation of women’s work in the United Nation’s (UN) official System of National Accounts (SNA), which provide summary measures of economic performance and were intended to cover market transactions only, has been pointed out repeatedly since the late 1970s (Benería 1992a). The exclusion is substantial. Among existing studies on time use, non-SNA pro

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