Affordable Access

Saddleback Caterpillar Acharia stimulea (Clemens) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Limacodidae)

Authors
Publisher
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Publication Date
Disciplines
  • Agricultural Science
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Political Science
  • Religious Science

Abstract

EENY-522 Saddleback Caterpillar Acharia stimulea (Clemens) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Limacodidae)1 Christopher S. Bibbs and J. Howard Frank2 1. This document is EENY-522, one of a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date March 2012. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Christopher S. Bibbs and J. Howard Frank, professors Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A&M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Millie Ferrer-Chancy, Interim Dean Introduction Acharia stimulea (Clemens) is a limacodid moth, or slug moth, best known for its larval growth phase. Distinct bright color patterns and the presence of venomous, urticating spines lead to its recognition as the saddleback caterpillar. It is native to a large range in the eastern United States and able to feed on a wide array of host plant species. This species can survive well in northern temperate areas and warmer southern climates. The saddleback caterpillar is encountered most frequently as a medically significant pest, and has minor effects in landscaping and agriculture. Synonymy Empretia stimulea Clemens Limacodes ephippiatus Harris Sibine stimulea (Clemens) Acharia stimulea (Clemens) (Dyar and Morton 1896) Distribution Acharia stimulea has a wide range in the eastern Uni

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.