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Graduates of Lebanese medical schools in the United States: an observational study of international migration of physicians

Authors
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine

Abstract

1472-6963-7-49.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Health Services Research Open AcceResearch article Graduates of Lebanese medical schools in the United States: an observational study of international migration of physicians Elie A Akl*1,2,3, Nancy Maroun4, Stella Major5, Bechara Chahoud6 and Holger J Schünemann7 Address: 1Department of Medicine, University at Buffalo, NY, USA, 2Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, NY, USA, 3Medical Education Teaching and Research Innovation Center (METRIC), University at Buffalo, NY, USA, 4Department of Sociology, University at Buffalo, NY, USA, 5Department of Family Medicine, American University of Beirut, Lebanon, 6Department of Medicine, Lebanese University, Lebanon and 7INFORMA, Italian National Cancer Institute Regina Elena, Rome, Italy Email: Elie A Akl* - [email protected]; Nancy Maroun - [email protected]; Stella Major - [email protected]; Bechara Chahoud - [email protected]; Holger J Schünemann - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: As healthcare systems around the world are facing increasing physician shortages, more physicians are migrating from low to high income countries. As an illustrative case of international migration of physicians, we evaluated the current number and historical trends of Lebanese medical graduates (LMG) in the US, and compared their characteristics to those of US medical graduates (USMG) and other international medical graduates (IMG). Methods: We evaluated the number of LMG using the 2004 the American Medical Association Physicians' Professional Data (AMA-PPD) and then compared it to the number of graduates of other countries. We evaluated the historical trends using the 1978–2004 historical files of the AMA-PPD. We analyzed the characteristics of all LMG and compared them to a random sample of 1000 USMG and a random sample of 1000 IMG using the 2004 AMA-PPD. Results: In 2004, there were 2,796 LMG in the US, constituting 1.3% of all IMG

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