Affordable Access

Publisher Website

“Toy” presses and the rise of fugitive U.S. government documents

Authors
Journal
Journal of Government Information
1352-0237
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
21
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/1352-0237(94)90019-1
Disciplines
  • Law
  • Political Science

Abstract

Abstract This article examines the policies and practices of U.S. executive branch printing during the 1930s. Particular attention is given to such issues as the lack of congressional guidance and support; the development and use of new printing technologies, which enabled the executive departments to exercise greater administrative control over printing; and the diminished authority of the Public Printer. All of this contributed to the growth of fugitive U.S. government documents. The number of parallels with present-day government information is remarkable.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments

More articles like this

Uranium's Valency in U3S5

on Journal of Solid State Chemist... Jan 01, 2000

Combination of the Loss of cmnm5U34with the Lack o...

on Journal of Molecular Biology Jan 01, 2010

U2Ru2Sn: a new Kondo insulator?

on Physica B Condensed Matter Jan 01, 2002
More articles like this..